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A boomerang is a thrown tool, typically constructed as a flat airfoil, that is designed to spin about an axis perpendicular to the direction of its flight. A returning boomerang is designed to return to the thrower. It is well known as a weapon used by Indigenous Australians for hunting. The first boomerangs were used for hunting and killing. The hunting type could be hurled at distances of 150 to 200 yards. They hovered just above the ground at high speed killing small animals or stunning larger ones like kangaroos. This killing boomerang did not return.
The first boomerangs were heavy projectile objects thrown by hunters to bludgeon a target with speed and accuracy. They were most likely made out of flattened sticks or animal tusks, and they were not intended to return to their thrower that is until someone unknowingly carved the weapon into just the right shape needed for it to spin. And Proper wing design produces the lift needed for a boomerang’s flight, the wings are designed to generate lift as they spin through the air, occurs due to the wings foil shaped and their angle of attack, also the possible addition to reducing a sloping edge on the underside of the wings.
But a phenomenon known as gyroscopic precession is the key to making a returning boomerang come back to its thrower. When the boomerang spins, one wing is actually moving through the air faster than the other which is relative to the air, as the boomerang is moving forward as a whole. As the top wing is spinning forward, the lift force on that wing is greater and results in unbalanced forces that gradually turn the boomerang. The difference in lift force between the two sides of the boomerang produces a consistent torque that makes the boomerang turn. It soars through the air and gradually loops back around in a circle.
Not all boomerangs come back cause the boomerang's path to curve in an elliptical shape so that it will return to the thrower when thrown correctly. Throwers compete in all sorts of skill areas, such as farthest throw, the accuracy of return and the longest time aloft. David Schummy of Australia holds the Guinness World Record for the longest throw at an incredible 1,401.5 feet.
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